‘1917’ Is Being Called The Best War Film Since ‘Saving Private Ryan’

Alfie PowellAlfie Powell in Entertainment, Film
Published 26.11.19
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The war epic 1917 is being called the best war film since Saving Private Ryan, with critics lauding the powerful and haunting picture.

Since Saving Private Ryan, there’s been hundreds of war films – though for some reason the only one I can think of is Black Hawk Down – but it’s 1917 that apparently stands head and shoulders above all.

The World War One film, directed by Skyfall’s Sam Mendes, chronicles the tale of:

Two young British soldiers, Schofield (George MacKay) and Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman), [who] are given a seemingly impossible mission to deliver a message which will warn of an ambush during one of the skirmishes soon after the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line during Operation Alberich’ in northern France.

The two recruits race against time, crossing enemy territory to deliver the warning and keep a British battalion of 1,600 men, which includes Blake’s own brother, from walking into a deadly trap.

The pair must give their all to accomplish their mission by surviving the war to end all wars.

Have a watch of the trailer…

The film has a pretty stellar cast, with Chapman and MacKay being joined by the likes of Benedict Cumberbatch, Richard Madden, Andrew Scott and Mark Strong.

When is 1917 out in cinemas?

Rather annoyingly, though 1917 will be out on Christmas Day in the US, us folk in the UK will have to wait until the 10th of January to watch it.

But is it worth the wait? Apparently yes

Business Insider wrote:

The artistry of how this movie is photographed will be marvelled over for decades to come.

The Guardian added:

Sam Mendes’s 1917 is an amazingly audacious film; as exciting as a heist movie, disturbing as a sci-fi nightmare.

Leah Greenblatt from Entertainment Weekly said: “Legendary cinematographer Roger Deakins (No Country for Old Men, Fargo, Blade Runner 2049) effectively drops the viewer in the centre of the story and compels them to stay there, fully immersed in every muddy step, hunger pang, and rifle click.”

Meanwhile, over on Rotten Tomatoes, 1917 currently has 91%. I still don’t understand how Rotten Tomatoes works, but that sure sounds good, right?

I am a big Sam Mendes fan so I might have to go and see this one…

Images via Universal

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