The BBC have released their annual list of star salaries and it makes for some interesting with cuts and increases.

All the stars who earn above £150,000 have their earnings listed in the annual report of the BBC, although it is worth noting that some stars will not have their full wage noted because they work on commercial programming.

For example, Zoe Ball’s wage for her work on Strictly is not taken into account here and similarly, the presenters of Top Gear do not feature in the list. Nonetheless, the list makes for interesting reading.

Gary Lineker tops BBC wages

The top ten earners are:

Gary Lineker: £1,750,000-£1,754,999

Zoe Ball: £1,360,000-£1,364,999

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Graham Norton: £725,000-£729,999

Steve Wright: £475,000-£479,999

Huw Edwards: £465,000-£469,999

Fiona Bruce: £450,000-£454,999

Vanessa Feltz: £405,000-£409,999

Lauren Laverne: £395,000 – £399,999

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Alan Shearer: £390,000-£394,999

The earnings show a sharp increase for Zoe Ball who has increased her earnings by £995,000 in the last year, and others had a more gentle rise.

The likes of Alan Shearer saw a £50,000 decrease while Gary Lineker had his wage remain consistent, this may mean that the BBC is reallocating money from sports programmes and pursuing new avenues.

Naturally, with these large figures, some aren’t happy with how their license fee is being spent. Particularly after pensioners have had to begin paying the fee. It should be noted that the figures presented in some of the Tweets are not accurate.

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However, others felt that the wages needed to be contextualised and through a lense of broadcast spending were not enough of a reason for outrage.

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The wages seem to have split opinion but it is worth remembering that the government enforced changes to pensioners fee and with that in mind, these two points are not as closely aligned as they may seem. However, some are just unhappy with the significant wages some presenters earn.

With that said, good work if you can get it!

Images via BBC / Alamy