Guy Creates Periscope Glasses To Help Short People See The World Better

Alfie PowellAlfie Powell in Funny, News
Published 10.06.19
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Now short people can enjoy gigs easier, with the brand new periscope glasses…

2019 is really the gift that keeps on giving, isn’t it?

I am not a tall man. I’m a little goblin boy of 5’8″ and that’s rubbish for a number of reasons; the main ones being that Tinder girls never gave me the time of day until I took my height out of my bio – but now I have to clarify how tall they are before we actually go out – and I can’t see/reach everything I’d like to.

With that, I’m always mostly a little bit angsty and always feel like a kid on his way to school on a mufti day, rather than a 23-year-old man on his way to work on my commute.

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But there’s help on the horizon, at least for one of my problems, as Dominic Wilcox has designed a way for people like me and Josh (that’s right I’m throwing him under the bus, too) to see over the Richard Osmans and the LeBron James’s of the world. Not often you get those two in the same sentence, is it?

Basically, the London-based designer has invented a wearable periscope that adds 30.5 centimetres to the height of your eyes, meaning your point of view will tower above most others.

periscope short people

The periscope glasses use two mirrors at 45 degree angles, and sits very noticeably on your face like big ol’ eyesore it is.

Wilcox was initially challenged by Microsoft Surface and told to solve various everyday problems. He said he got his idea when he was at a gig and saw a shorter person struggling to see the act before them:

I was standing at a gig and turned to see a small woman dancing away but unable to see the band due to the tall people in front of her.

This gave me the idea to design a way for people to see over obstacles such as six-foot-plus people like me. It works well, though dancing with it on might be a challenge!

short people dominic wilcox

Though you can’t buy Wilcox’s glasses yet, they were shown at the Extraordinary Solutions to everyday Problems exhibit during the D&AD Festival in London last month, so you know, give it a bit of time…

He went on to tell the Mirror:

Some people get their thrills from bungee jumping or scoring a winning goal at Wembley, but I get mine from coming up with creative ideas.

Creativity is important because the world has many problems and challenges, and we need a lot more people with creative solutions to solve them. I think that everyone can become more creative and increase their ability to think up new ideas.

Can you make some Tupperware that doesn’t turn permanently orange the second you have bolognese anywhere near it next? These are big issues.

Images via DominicWilcox.com

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