Here’s Why Arya Is Destined To Fulfil The ‘Prince That Was Promised’ Prophecy In The ‘GoT’ Finale

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Spoilers!

The Prince That Was Promised Prophecy has been teased throughout the entirety of Game Of Thrones, and now, with one episode to go, Arya looks destined to fulfil it.

I’ve spoken at length about my admiration for Arya Stark, who has braved all sorts of perils and trained under the guidance of former mentor, assassin Jaqen H’ghar, to become one of the most feared warriors in Westeros.

Just ask the Night King how lethal she can be.

Yes, her character arc has been glorious to behold, but it’s not over yet…

Remember The Prince That Was Promised prophecy? It mainly comes from the books, but you’ll recall that Melisandre thought it was Stannis Baratheon for the longest time in the TV series.

Essentially, the Prince That Was Promised is a hero prophesied to save mankind after darkness sets in. When the first Long Night set in, he helped the Children of the Forest defeat the White Walkers at the Battle for the Dawn, and ever since, this Last Hero has been revered as a saviour.

He is known by many names throughout Westeros, but the followers of the Lord of Light know him as Azor Ahai, and they say he will return one day to save everyone’s bacon.

The show has differed greatly from the books, but Melisandre has mentioned The Prince That Was Promised and Azor Ahai interchangeably, but tends to use the name Azor Ahai far more often. It’s widely thought they are one and the same prophecy.

Now, generally, it’s always been thought that Jon or Daenerys is this Prince (or Princess) That Was Promised – or Azor Ahai – and that “his is the song of ice and fire” – which is referenced in the books.

As I say, everyone mostly assumed this was Jon – his father his Rhaegar Targaryen (fire) and his mother is Lyanna Stark (ice), so that would make total sense, but ever since Arya despatched of the Night King, it looks increasingly likely that she’s whom the prophecy refers to.

After the most recent episode, there are several indicators that Daenerys “Mad Queen” Taragryen is next on Arya’s kill list – which I’ve discussed here.

Until now, we’ve always thought the prophecy of ice and fire is this harmonious song about bringing the two together and creating balance – or peace – but if Arya does kill Daenerys in next week’s episode, she’ll become the Prince That Was Promised by destroying ice and fire, not by bringing them together.

Think about it: although it wasn’t interpreted in this way, Arya really will have become Westeros’ great saviour, saving everyone from inevitable death at the hands of the Night King, and endless subjugation under the tyranny of the Mad Queen Daenerys.

George R.R. Martin once said about prophecies: “You have to handle them very carefully; I mean, they can add depth and interest to a book, but you don’t want to be too literal or too easy.”

It’d be classic Game Of Thrones to turn this long-standing prophecy on its head at the eleventh hour, delivering the bittersweet ending that so many of us predicted. No Night King, no Daenerys, just a Prince (or Princess) That Was Promised, ridding the world of both ice and fire in order to create harmony.

Either that, or, I dunno, the showrunners will just stick Bran on the Iron Throne for the absolute banter.

Both outcomes are equally likely at this point.

Images via HBO

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