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Oral Sex Linked To Surge In Throat Cancer Cases, Experts Say

According to Dr. Hisham Mehanna, a professor at the Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences at the University of Birmingham, we are currently in the midst of an epidemic of throat cancer. The expert's concern is oral sex linked to surge in throat cancer cases.

Morgan Maverick
May 09, 20237 Shares269 Views
According to Dr. Hisham Mehanna, a professor at the Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences at the University of Birmingham, we are currently in the midst of an epidemic of throat cancer. The expert's concern is oral sex linked to surge in throat cancer cases.

Oral Sex Linked To Surge In Throat Cancer Cases

This disease has become more prevalent in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other Western countries. What is causing this epidemic? Apparently, it is none other than oral sex.
However, the issue goes much deeper than just oral sex. Dr. Mehanna notes that there has been a rapid increase in a specific type of throat cancer called oropharyngeal cancer, which affects the tonsils and back of the throat. This type of cancer is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV).
Dr. Mehanna notes that the main risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer is the number of lifetime sexual partners, especially when it comes to oral sex. Research from the American Cancer Society shows that HPV-linked oropharyngeal cancer rose by 1.3 percent for women and 2.8 percent for men between 2015 and 2019.
In the United States, nearly 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancers are reportedly caused by HPV infection. This virus is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in America.
Throat Cancer
Throat Cancer
The issue is further compounded by the fact that individuals who have had 10 or more oral sex partners are four times more likely to get this specific type of throat cancer, according to research. Furthermore, individuals with six or more lifetime oral sex partners are 8.5 times more likely to develop oropharyngeal cancer as compared to those who do not engage in oral sex at all.
Dr. Mehanna explains that the prevailing theory is that most people catch HPV infections and are able to clear them completely. However, a small number of people are not able to get rid of the infection, possibly due to a defect in a particular aspect of their immune system.
The issue of oropharyngeal cancer caused by HPV is a growing concern. Dr. Mehanna notes that “we are seeing a significant increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancers. In the United States, the number of oropharyngeal cancer cases has surpassed cervical cancer cases as the most common cancer caused by HPV.”
What can be done to combat this epidemic? Dr. Mehanna notes that vaccination against HPV can be effective in preventing the spread of the virus, which can ultimately reduce the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer. Additionally, individuals should be aware of the risks associated with oral sex and take steps to reduce their risk of contracting HPV.

Conclusion

Dr. Mehanna’s research is an important reminder that sexually transmitted infections can have serious consequences beyond the immediate health risks. In the case of HPV, the virus can lead to a potentially life-threatening form of cancer. By taking steps to prevent the spread of HPV, individuals can reduce their risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer and other HPV-related cancers.
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