This New Battery Powered Forehead Buzzer Will Stop Your Partner’s Snoring

Alfie PowellAlfie Powell in News, Weird
Published 17.10.19
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This battery-powered device will stop you from snoring by buzzing.

Snoring is a pretty cruel joke, isn’t it? Everyone’s favourite thing to do is sleep, and yet we have to put up with some people (me) who do it loudly.

There’s no need for it. Absolutely no evolutionary advantage to snoring and yet (I’m going to make up a stat) 83% of people do it.

The thing is, most people refuse to believe that they do in fact do it, and for those who do acknowledge their noisy habit, there’s really no solving it because there’s about 125 different cures and none of them work.

The general vibe is that if and when you can, sleep on your side and that will help you not snore, because the body is weird like that, but it’s quite easy to not be in control when you’re asleep.

With that, a rather clever new device has appeared in the wide world and it may be the answer we’ve all been waiting for.

Here to help ease the effects of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), Somnibel is a device that claims to be plaster-sized, despite being pretty damn big, that you stick onto your forehead.

somnibel

The website states:

It is a Medical product that consists of a small piece of equipment weighing 17 g that sticks to the forehead using a single-use hypoallergenic adhesive.

The device lightly vibrates when the patient sleeps in the supine position to induce him to change body position, reducing the occurrence of respiratory events while sleeping, whether as a result of positional apnea and snoring.”

Essentially, the Somnibel buzzes every time you lie on your back, nudging you back onto your side and stopping you from snoring.

somnibel stop apnea

A clinical trial involving 128 patients was conducted to test the effects of the device with an apparent 31% drop in apnoeas in the first week alone.

Ear, nose and throat specialist at Sheffield University, Professor Jaydip Ray, told the MailOnline:

Simple snoring is a common social and medical problem that adversely affects many people.

Easy to use, unobtrusive wearable devices using miniaturised accelerometers are a welcome solution for many of them. This initial study is encouraging.

You can’t buy one just yet, unfortunately, but it won’t be long until that changes.

Images via Sibelmed, Getty

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