Triggered Christians Mistakenly Petition For Netflix To Cancel Amazon Prime Show ‘Good Omens’

Alfie PowellAlfie Powell in Entertainment, Netflix, TV
Published 21.06.19
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A group of Christian activists are rallying to cancel Amazon Prime Video’s Good Omens, but they’re complaining to the wrong company.

Amazon’s Good Omens released to pretty good reviews from both critics and the public, and other than a few mentions on a podcast I listen to and a heavy-handed advertising campaign at Waterloo Station, it more of less flew under the radar.

I tried to watch the first episode with my dad but none of us could really get on with it. On a personal note, I hate Jack Whitehall, but apart from that, what I saw was just acres of exposition. You know that whole ‘show, don’t tell’ thing? They really flipped that on its head.

good omens complaint amazon

Subversion can be good – take the beginning of Endgame – but not in this way.

Anyway, enough about me, some other people didn’t like the show, but it was for another completely different reason. A group of Christians were enraged with, I suppose, the disrespect shown towards their faith.

The complaints are mainly about how the main angel (played my Michael Sheen) and the main demon (David Tennant) have a close relationship, as well as God being portrayed by a woman. With that, a petition was started that soon gained over 20,000 signatures. The only issue? Yeah it was to the wrong company.

good omens cancel petition netflix

They addressed it to Netflix.

The creator of the show, Neil Gaiman, found this out and decided to tweet about the affair…

The Christian activist group, fairly nefariously named ‘Return To Order’, have yet to make any amendments to their petition and here’s to hoping they don’t.

Maybe I should give Good Omens another go. If anyone’s reading this who watched it, do they stop explaining every single plot detail to ridiculous degrees once you get past the first episode, or is it all like that?

I can’t be doing with God letting me know everything that’s happened and the reasoning behind every move before someone actually does it. It feels like reading a book and having to look up each word in a dictionary as you go.

Bloody Netflix.

Images via Amazon

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