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Squatter Who Moved Into Pensioner's Empty Home Worth $502K Has Sold The Property For $677K

In an extraordinary turn of events, a squatter in London found himself at the center of a property saga that has captured public attention. The squatter who moved into pensioner's empty home worth $502K has sold the property for $677K.

Xander Oddity
Dec 07, 20236496 Shares110095 Views
In an extraordinary turn of events, a squatter in London found himself at the center of a property saga that has captured public attention. The squatter who moved into pensioner's empty home worth $502K has sold the property for $677K.
After moving into an empty home worth $502K (£400K), the squatter, identified as Keith Best, not only won legal rights to the property but also managed to sell it for a substantial $677K(£540K). This unexpected and legally intricate journey has raised eyebrows and sparked discussions on property laws and the rights of squatters in the UK.
The case of Keith Best brings attention to the complexities of property laws in the UK, particularly concerning squatters' rights. The legal battles and controversies surrounding his occupancy shed light on the intricacies of the legal system and the challenges faced by property owners dealing with unconventional residency situations.
While working in East London, builder Keith Best noticed an empty semi-detached property with three bedrooms. Thus, back in 2012, he made the decision to treat it as his own, gave it some renovations, and moved in officially with his wife and child.
Naturally, this is squatting, which is the deliberate unauthorized entry and subsequent habitation of a space. The squatter who moved into pensioner's empty home worth $502K has sold the property for $677K.
Best was ultimately charged with essentially "stealing" the property from retired Colin Curtis, who had lived there with his mother until he moved out in the late 1990s. Following his move in, the builder filed for and was granted permanent possession of the land, which he did so after an appeal.
All of this occurred even though the judge acknowledged the man had broken the law by trespassing on property that was valued at approximately £400,000 at the time.
The new owner said they were unaware of the property's contentious background until they learned about it from MailOnline, but insisted that "everything was done properly" with the selling of the house.
The case of Keith Best is likely to prompt discussions about potential revisions to property legislation, particularly in addressing the rights and responsibilities of squatters. Policymakers and legal experts may revisit existing laws to ensure a fair balance between property owners' rights and the protection of vulnerable individuals seeking shelter in vacant properties.
The sale of the property by Keith Best also offers insights into the dynamics of the London real estate market. The willingness of a buyer to acquire a property with such a unique history raises questions about the factors that influence property values and the motivations behind property investments in a competitive urban environment.

Conclusion

London squatter who moved into pensioner's empty home worth $502K has sold the property for $677K. The tale of Keith Best, the squatter turned property seller, is a multifaceted narrative that intertwines legal complexities, property market dynamics, and social issues related to housing.
As the story continues to unfold, it prompts reflections on the intricacies of property laws, the challenges faced by those seeking shelter, and the potential impacts on real estate legislation in the pursuit of a more equitable housing landscape.
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